Banknote Corporation of America, Inc. USPS Presentation

With a ten-year contract riding on a single presentation, this wasn’t a job for PowerPoint.

Our client needed to dazzle a roomful of Postal Service potentates. At stake was a contract to print postage stamps. Banknote absolutely deserved to win the contract but didn’t want to take any chances with a boring presentation. Our job: take a list of factoids (e.g. “94,000 sq. ft. facility”) and make them dance.

THE SITUATION
Banknote Corporation of America was the first private company to print stamps for the U.S. Postal Service. And that was just one of a long string of innovations originating with this company. But even though Banknote hits it out of the park again and again and again, they still have to periodically prove to the government that they’ve still got it. When their stamp printing contract came up for renewal, they were in no mood to rest on their laurels. (And, with a new person heading up the USPS and reviewing contracts with a fine tooth comb.) They were granted a two-hour audience with decision makers, in which they were invited to present the data that would prove them capable of helping the postal service meet the challenges of the next ten years.

THE SOLUTION
Our creative team designed a presentation that brought the data to life. Using typography, design, animation, video and any other tool we could think of to keep things interesting, (to keep things interesting? or to make the points about Banknote’s capabilities?) we made sure the screen in the presentation room in Washington, D.C. was the liveliest rectangle in a four-block radius.

THE OUTCOME
The folks at the Postal Service told Banknote they’d never seen a presentation like that. They also said “You’ve got the contract.” Yay Banknote. Yay Postal Service. And okay, yay us.

One presentation we created demonstrated our client’s idea for a smartphone app that scans postage stamps to access content including music and video.
Another presentation brought a bunch of what could have been boring factoids to life in an engaging way.